Category Archives: SOS

We WILL Save Our Symphony!


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New post by Drew McManus

March 22, 2011 | Drew McManus

I received a copy of a letter from Sandra Reitelman, the former Director of Corporate Fund-raising for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO) from 2004-2006. In her letter, Reitelman characterizes “an incomplete ability to draw audiences and financial support” resulting from specific limitations within the workplace environment as a cornerstone for the ongoing institutional troubles. At the same time, she is careful to say that she is not speaking of “mismanagement of finances, or of board negligence”…

Click HERE for the article on Adaptistration.com


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Membership Drive!

SOS NEEDS YOUR HELP TO BUILD OUR BASE!

Click HERE to join SOS

We are growing but we need to grow faster!

THE CHALLENGE:
Our current membership base is over 5,000 supporters.
In the few days left before the March 30th DSO Board meeting, SOS wants to double our membership.

WE CAN DO THIS!

HERE’S HOW:
Our membership could grow to 10,000 overnight if every SOS member brought in just ONE NEW MEMBER! Reach out now to your friends and family. Add new members to our voice.

WHY NOW:
The Board meeting on the 30th is the last best opportunity to end the strike.
BY VOTING FOR BINDING ARBITRATION, THE BOARD CAN END THE STRIKE NOW.

WHY SOS?
SOS has become the voice of the community: The more SOS members, the louder our voice.

Let your voice be heard. Reach out now to increase our membership!

Please share this link:

http://saveoursymphony.us2.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=f07f19805f21b7ce52858eaed&id=01abed8a61

A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.
-Mahatma Gandhi


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Support for DSO musicians from our neighbors to the north.

Click HERE to read the article on the Organization of Canadian Symphony Musicians website.

Detroit wristbands send a message of support

OCSM encourages all member orchestras to show your support for the musicians of the Detroit Symphony with Save Our Symphony Solidarity wristbands. These blue wristbands are a reminder to all that the stage of The Max in Detroit is still dark after more than 20 weeks of a labour dispute. They also communicate to the public that orchestra musicians across North America stand together to support one another.

Solidarity wristbands have already been worn by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Florida Orchestra, Louisville Orchestra, Milwaukee Symphony, Oregon Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, and The Cleveland Orchestra. San Francisco Symphony flutist Cathy Payne writes, “We crafted a joint statement from the entire SFS Family – Musicians, Board, and Administration – that has been inserted in our program books, thanking our audiences for their support, confirming the importance of symphonic music in our communities, directing our patrons to the DSO Musicians and Save our Symphony websites, and urging them to send letters of support encouraging all parties to find a resolution that gets the DSO back on The Max stage.”

Similar actions are already planned in Calgary and Vancouver. To obtain Solidarity wristbands for your orchestra ($20 for 10 wristbands), please visit the Save Our Symphony website:

http://saveoursymphony.info/solidarity-wristband/

Thank you for your support!


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Phil Dikeman says “Good-Bye”

Philip Dikeman says, “Good-bye”

The Musicians of the DSO are sad to announce the departure of Philip Dikeman, Assistant Principal Flute of the DSO since 1992 and Acting Principal Flute since 2010.

In a conversation this past weekend, Phil said, “When I joined the DSO in 1992, I had already played professionally for 5 years. I won my first job overseas soon after earning my Master’s Degree from Yale in 1987. When I was appointed to the Assistant Principal Flute position with the DSO, it was like a dream come true. It was amazing to think I was going to become a member of a major American Symphony Orchestra. I can’t begin to express how proud I was to be a part of this great ensemble. For almost two decades, I have had the pleasure of working with the many amazing and inspiring musicians who make up the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Performing with an orchestra of the caliber of the DSO has been an extreme privilege and I am grateful I could be a part of something so special these past 19 years.”

The same can be said for how the orchestra feels about Philip. Phil is in the prime of his career and his impeccable musicianship, his crystal clear tone zinging to the back of Orchestra Hall and his amazing sense of ensemble will be missed. It will not be easy finding someone to replace Phil.

Philip has accepted a teaching position at Vanderbilt University. He says, “Making the choice to leave the DSO was not an easy one and I spent a lot of time thinking about it before reaching a decision. However, I finally realized that accepting the post at The Blair School of Music at Vanderbilt University was the right thing for me to do at this point in my life. I’m looking forward to beginning this new phase of my career by focusing on teaching, finding many new outlets for performance, and doing more traveling and playing throughout the United States and abroad. I know that I will miss my colleagues in the DSO very much. The kind of music making that I’ve experienced here is not something to be taken for granted and I will cherish the countless memories I’ve shared with my colleagues. I wish them all the best as they continue the struggle to uphold a level of artistry that is befitting to the Musicians of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.”

We understand and support Phil’s move to Vanderbilt and Nashville. Thank you, Phil! We wish you nothing but the best as you pursue your career elsewhere.

—The Musicians of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra


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Symphony Discord Plays Out In Facebook Fracas

by Jennifer Guerra

March 16, 2011 from MR

Before the musicians strike began in late 2010, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Facebook fan page used to look like a typical fan page with posts about visiting conductors, upcoming concerts and the orchestra’s Tiny Tots series.

But once the strike began it essentially hijacked the fan page. While the DSO may have wanted to talk about Tiny Tots concerts, the audience wanted to talk about the orchestra’s problems.

The musicians used their own Facebook fan page to post updates there.

So, management started doing the same thing on the official fan page.

But this Facebook fight could affect what happens once the fight is all over…

Click HERE to listen to the audio article.

Click HERE for a link to the article on National Public Radio


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Where are the Missing DSO Donors?


In only a dozen years, 1996 to 2008, the DSO’s donor base plummeted 80% from a high of 25,000 donors to fewer than 5,000.

.

*Data Source: DSO’s Development Department

Why did 20,000 DSO donors disappear?

When asked what the reason was for the precipitous decline in donor numbers, Pamela Ruthven, former CFO and VP for Development, provided an explanation to the Sub-Finance Committee of Strategic Planning on July 27, 2006. She recorded the following statements:

“Over the past three years, the fundraising goals have been achieved to a large degree by extracting increasingly larger gifts out of an increasingly smaller pool of donors.”

“For the next several years, we will need to focus on increasing the number of donors (adding new donors.) This is something that we have not done in recent years, as our primary objective was to raise the most fundraising revenue as quickly as cheaply as possible, given the financial challenges the organization was facing.”

“We also discussed the high rate of turnover in the development department, some of the drivers behind it and its negative impact on our ability to efficiently fundraise.”

Where did the missing DSO’s donors go?

  • Some donors inevitably moved or passed away.
  • Fundraising targets were achieved year-after-year by employing the cheaper strategy of requesting larger, and as it turned out, multiple gifts annually from the most wealthy supporters of the Detroit Symphony. The core of this small pool of donors were, and still are, the DSO’s Board of Directors.
  • This strategy allowed the DSO to reduce costs by not having to solicit a host of small and mid-range donors. However, when the DSO stopped asking – most of these donors stopped giving.

Development staff remained at the DSO an of average only 15 months before leaving to find work elsewhere, reducing the effectiveness of the DSO’s fundraising efforts.

Despite having identified the need to grow the donor numbers and stem the revolving door in the development department in 2006, those trends continued unabated through 2010. The donor base was allowed to erode even further and four different VP’s for development were hired between 2007 and 2010.

Now, eight years of heroic giving has stretched DSO’s board members beyond their capacity to give more, and they are convinced that Metro Detroit can no longer afford a world-class orchestra because they can no long afford one. The eighty-seven member board accounts for almost 50% of the individual giving which supports the symphony. The DSO’s wide and deep donor base has melted away.

In DSO Dashboard – January 2010, a document created with the help of TDC consultants hired by the Hudson Weber Foundation, management acknowledged that many potential donors still exist in the Metro Detroit area when they set a goal to double the size of the donor base from 5,000 donors to 10,000 in just three years.

The question is: If the DSO’s leadership recognized that this many lapsed and new donors could be cultivated in a relatively short time, why haven’t the DSO’s leadership engaged in a massive public campaign, in the last year, to reach these donors more quickly?


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Article on TheDaily.com

Months before protesters camped out in the Wisconsin Capitol, union workers went on strike in downtown Detroit. They weren’t autoworkers or even teachers; they were musicians clad in tuxes and tails.

Now in its 22nd week, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra strike has been as bitter and destructive as any labor fight. Negotiations hit a low in February when the musicians rejected what management called its “final offer,” and management put the rest of the season on ice. But there is faint hope, as the musicians voted Tuesday to propose a binding arbitration process to resolve the symphony’s fate. Management has yet to agree to the offer, which would return the orchestra to the stage…

Click HERE for a link to the entire article on TheDaily.com.   It includes a video of some lovely playing by Joe Striplin, DSO Violinist.


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DSO’s Leadership rejects binding arbitration

DSO’s Leadership Rejects Binding Arbitration

After the rejection of DSO Management’s “final offer” by the musicians on February 19, the orchestra members continued to try to find a compromise that would bring the orchestra back on stage. On Tuesday, March 1, we offered to return to work immediately if management would agree to submit all remaining unresolved issues from the last offer of each side to binding arbitration before a three-person panel. The majority could adopt the position of one party over the position of the other, or they could propose something different.

Offering binding arbitration as a solution is not an option we choose lightly; it means we would have to give up control over some of the very issues we are striking over. Still, we feel it is the only way to get the orchestra immediately back on stage as performances can begin while the arbitration process finalizes a contract in the background. Earned and contributed revenue can begin to flow with the assurance that a contract will follow. A much needed healing process can begin for the entire community. This is a fair, equitable, and expeditious way of preserving this great institution for now, and for future generations. This is our goal.

Although DSO PR Director Elizabeth Weigandt attended the musicians’ 2 pm press conference in front of Orchestra Hall on March 1, took notes, and was handed a full statement of the binding arbitration proposal, DSO management chose to pretend late that afternoon that they knew nothing definite beyond the fact that we were offering to return to work. They proceeded to send the musicians’ bargaining team their own completely different proposal:

1. The musicians must come back to work under management’s imposed “Proposal “B” with a no-strike agreement.
2. Once on stage, with an agreement not to go on strike again, the parties would meet with a mediator to discuss their differences, for yet another time.
3. Then, at some point in the future, the parties would discuss the possibility of maybe having limited binding arbitration on a small number of issues which would not include management’s financial offer, allocation of the money in that offer, media proposal, and other issues important to management.

And indeed this is how the management story has played out over the last five days. Contrary to assertions made to the press last Friday, March 4, DSO leaders failed to follow through on their stated willingness to engage in “earnest” talks over the weekend. In their last conversation with the musicians’ lawyer, Friday, DSO leadership verbally stated they could not agree to the musicians’ offer of binding arbitration as a pathway to return the musicians to the stage. After refusing to formalize their statement in writing, they then announced in the press that discussions would be ongoing over the weekend. In reality, discussions stopped. After the exchange of each other’s “pathway,” management said they would call the musicians’ lawyer over the weekend to continue discussions. They didn’t. DSO’s leadership obviously doesn’t want the orchestra back under any conditions other than its own and are attempting to delay and delay. What are they afraid of? DSO’s leadership misled everyone then and continues to mislead with their latest negotiations update.

The musicians have appealed to the full DSO Board, as the men and women who are legally responsible for the fate of the institution, to meet and vote on our binding arbitration offer. We believe that they owe as much to the entire community.

– The Musicians of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra


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DSO Executives fail to hold promised talks.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 3/7/11
Contact: Greg Bowens, Bowens & Co., 248.275.3156, bowensgreg@hotmail.com

DSO EXECUTIVES FAIL TO HOLD PROMISED TALKS ON ARBITRATION PROPOSAL OVER WEEKEND

Detroit – The striking musicians of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra are reporting that no talks were held between negotiators this past weekend as management assurances to the press Friday they would engage in such activities never materialized.

“DSO executives are saying one thing to the press and doing another privately,” said Gordon Stump, president of the musicians. “Management told the press, its board and the public that talks about any concerns they had over the arbitration pathway to a settlement would continue throughout the weekend. That did not happen.”

On Sunday musicians concluded their second day of hand delivering the proposal to board members. Word of CEO Anne Parsons’ startling email to members urging them to ignore the arbitration proposal drew sharp criticisms from supporters in social media over the weekend. Parson’s message was sent at 6:34 p.m. Friday — exactly 22 minutes after she, her lawyer and the musicians’ lawyer concluded a conference call at 6:12 p.m. That conference call was the last communication between the parties despite assurances from management to the press on the same day that they would continue over the weekend.

Even so, reaction about managements’ high handed tactics towards members of its governing body did not go unnoticed by the public. Reaction to the tersely worded email sent at 6:34 p.m. Friday, March 4, 2011 are posted on the musicians’ fan page.

“People know the DSO is a tax exempt, therefore publicly supported venture run by a board of directors from a broad cross section of citizens from Detroit and the surrounding communities,” said Stump. “It is not a private company whose board members are accountable to shareholders looking for a quarterly dividend. They are accountable to the wider community. Their voice should not be silenced by a small cabal of executives acting as if the non-profit agency was their own private company.”

Musicians’ had emailed the same board members asking them to hold a meeting of the full board to vote and accept the Pathway to a Peaceful Settlement binding arbitration proposal. Musicians then went door-to-door this weekend visiting board members to deliver the letter (see attached).

Parsons’ tersely worded email said in part,” We learned that the musicians have sent letters and emails to the board this weekend urging you to agree to settle the contract through arbitration…Tell them, “Thank you for your email. As I’m sure you know, your offer is being discussed by your lawyer, orchestra management and our lawyer. Please direct all future communications on this subject through that channel.”

After telling the board members to ignore the musicians, Parson dismisses the idea that board members have any say in the decision to accept the musicians’ offer, “the management negotiating team will bring a recommendation to the executive committee on this topic as soon as we have something we feel you can support,” she writes.

The pressure by management to silence the board occurs in the wake of an offer made by the musicians to return to work and end the labor dispute while a binding arbitration process runs its course to a new contract. The musicians offered to submit all remaining unresolved issues to binding arbitration before a three person panel. They would select one arbitrator, DSO executives would select one, and these two individuals would select a third. The parties would present and argue their position on each of the unresolved issues, and ultimately, the panel would issue a final and binding decision which was approved by at least two of the three. The majority could adopt the position of one party over the position of the other, or they could propose something different. Any provisions of the arbitrators’ decision which can be made retroactively will be so implemented.

Meanwhile, the striking musicians are performing community concerts numbers 15 to 20 in March. For more information on the concert series and ticket prices visit www.detroitsymphonymusicians.org

-End-


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DSO CEO Anne Parsons tells board to mind their own business.

For immediate release 3/3/11
Contact: Greg Bowens, Bowens & Co., 248.275.3156, bowensgreg@hotmail.com

DSO CEO anne parsons TELLS BOARD TO MIND THEIR OWN BUSINESS AND LEAVE THE NEGOTIATING TO EXECUTIVES IN TERSE EMAIL THIS WEEKEND

Musicians press ahead with weekend visits encouraging board members to support the Pathway to a Peaceful Settlement Plan. “The DSO is a taxpayer supported non-profit not a private company run by a small cabal of executives, they say.

Detroit – Detroit Symphony Orchestra CEO Anne Parsons sent a startling email to members of the organization’s board of directors Friday urging them to ignore emails and letters from musicians that ask them to consider the Pathway to a Peaceful Settlement arbitration plan presented last week.

“We learned that the musicians have sent letters and emails to the board this weekend urging you to agree to settle the contract through arbitration,” writes Parson in the email forwarded by a recipient. Tell them, “Thank you for your email. As I’m sure you know, your offer is being discussed by your lawyer, orchestra management and our lawyer. Please direct all future communications on this subject through that channel.”

After telling the board members to ignore the musicians, Parson dismisses the idea that board members have any say in the decision to accept the musicians’ offer, “the management negotiating team will bring a recommendation to the executive committee on this topic as soon as we have something we feel you can support,” she writes.

The tersely worded email was sent at 6:34 p.m. Friday, March 4, 2011 moments after striking musicians’ had emailed the same board members asking them to hold a meeting of the full board to vote and accept the Pathway to a Peaceful Settlement binding arbitration proposal. Musicians are going door-to-door this weekend visiting board members.

“The DSO is a tax exempt, therefore publicly supported venture run by a board of directors from a broad cross section of citizens from Detroit and the surrounding communities,” said Gordon Stump, president of the musicians locally. “It is not a private company or corporation whose board members are accountable to shareholders looking for a quarterly dividend. They are accountable to the wider community. Their voice should not be silenced by a small cabal of executives acting as if the non-profit agency was their own private company.”

The pressure by management to silence their board of directors occurs in the wake of an offer made by the musicians to return to work and end the labor dispute while a binding arbitration process runs its course to a new contract. The musicians offered to submit all remaining unresolved issues to binding arbitration before a three person panel. They would select one arbitrator, DSO executives would select one, and these two individuals would select a third. The parties would present and argue their position on each of the unresolved issues, and ultimately, the panel would issue a final and binding decision which was approved by at least two of the three. The majority could adopt the position of one party over the position of the other, or they could propose something different. Any provisions of the arbitrators’ decision which can be made retroactively will be so implemented.

Meanwhile, the striking musicians are performing community concerts numbers 15 to 20 in March. For more information on the concert series and ticket prices visit www.detroitsymphonymusicians.org.

-End-


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Pathway to a peaceful settlement.

March 4, 2011

Dear Esteemed DSO Board Member,

We are writing to you to ask you to convene a meeting of the full Board of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, to consider and vote on our proposal to end the current strike through binding arbitration. The procedure we are asking you to agree to is a simple pathway to a peaceful settlement.

All remaining unresolved issues from the last offer of each side shall be submitted to binding arbitration before a three person panel. The Union would select one arbitrator, the DSO would select one, and these two individuals would select a third.

The parties would present and argue their position on each of the unresolved issues, and ultimately, the panel would issue a final and binding decision which was approved by at least two of the three. The majority could adopt the position of one party over the position of the other, or they could propose something different. Any provisions of the arbitrators’ decision which can be made retroactively, will be so implemented.

If this procedure is agreeable to both parties, as set forth above, the strike could end, and the orchestra could return to the stage immediately, under the terms of the DSO’s final offer of February 15, 2011.

This is a painful step for the musicians, considering they overwhelmingly rejected the Feb. 15 proposal. It may be a difficult step for management as well, since they publicly withdrew the proposal after they failed to secure a majority vote of the musicians.

We believe this to be a fair, equitable, and expeditious way of preserving this great institution for now, and for future generations.

We feel it is important to respond as quickly as possible, in order to salvage whatever is left of this season and prepare for exciting summer and fall seasons, while the arbitration case proceeds to a conclusion.

If this procedure is agreeable to both parties, the strike could end immediately. The DSO would begin generating revenue for the first time in five months. We are extending our hand in friendship with this offer. Please convene the Board of Directors and vote yes on this pathway to a peaceful settlement.

Sincerely,

The Musicians of the DSO


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Orchestras in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Denver, Minnesota and Washington show support for striking DSO musicians.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 3/3/11

Contact: Greg Bowens, Bowens & Co., 248.275.3156, bowensgreg@hotmail.com

DSO STRIKING MUSICIANS SPARK NATIONAL SOLIDARITY
Protests kick off in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Denver, Minnesota and Washington, D.C. this weekend.

Detroit – The striking musicians of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra are providing the spark for a national showing of support to occur this weekend in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Denver, and Washington, D.C. The coordinated national showings of support are the first to occur since the strike began last October.

“People from across the country are paying more and more attention to the labor dispute here in Detroit,” said Gordon Stump, president of the musicians locally. “These events in other cities demonstrate clearly that we are not just 80 musicians standing alone in this struggle – we are thousands of people from across the country standing together.”

Members of the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Boston Symphony, the Colorado Symphony in Denver, and the National Symphony in Washington, D.C. plan to participate in various forms to show their solidarity with the striking musicians of the DSO.

Plans are underway to include orchestras in more cities. They follow a pattern of widening support in the labor movement for the striking musicians. Two weeks ago, several dozen unions were rallied by the Metro Detroit AFL-CIO to protest with the musicians. And, the Chicago Symphony musicians distributed leaflets to their audience supporting the DSO musicians in January.

Still fighting for a resolution to the strike, musicians have made it clear that they are willing to return to the table to negotiate. Management, however, has stubbornly refused to continue negotiations, which brings to light a different motive. “Union busting is fashionable these days, but fortunately so is fighting back,” says AFM President Ray Hair. “Regardless of your trade or profession, be it musician, laborer, teacher, or engineer, ‘sticking together’ is no longer a cliché, but the key to surviving the class warfare that is rearing its ugly head throughout our country.”

The widening attention is occurring in the wake of an offer made by the musicians to return to work and end the labor dispute while a binding arbitration process runs its course to a new contract. The musicians offered to submit all remaining unresolved issues to binding arbitration before a three person panel. They would select one arbitrator, DSO executives would select one, and these two individuals would select a third. The parties would present and argue their position on each of the unresolved issues, and ultimately, the panel would issue a final and binding decision which was approved by at least two of the three. The majority could adopt the position of one party over the position of the other, or they could propose something different. Any provisions of the arbitrators’ decision which can be made retroactively will be so implemented.

Meanwhile, the striking musicians are performing community concerts numbers 15 to 20 in March. For more information on the concert series and ticket prices visit www.detroitsymphonymusicians.org.

-End-


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APNewsBreak: Musicians Band Together for Detroit

Musicians from four U.S. orchestras plan to wear bracelets during performances this weekend to support the striking members of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, a national musicians’ union said Thursday.

American Federation of Musicians spokeswoman Honore Stockley said that players are participating from the Colorado Symphony, Minnesota Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, D.C. The navy blue bracelets read “AFM Solidarity,” which refers to the national federation that is coordinating the effort…

Click HERE For a link to the entire article on ABCNews.go.com


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Editorial: Arbitration may point a way out of protracted DSO strike

The 21-week impasse between the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and its striking players union has brought one of this community’s proudest institutions to the brink of extinction. A new proposal, under which musicians would return to work under the terms of management’s most recent contract offer in exchange for an agreement to submit the dispute to binding arbitration, offers a plausible mechanism for resolving the bitter dispute, and the DSO board should embrace it…

Click HERE for a link to the entire article on Freep.com


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SOS applauds the steps taken by the musicians today!

This offer to return to work immediately, under the framework of binding arbitration, shows strength and commitment to the organization.

Because the musicians took this step the audiences and musicians can return to Orchestra Hall and the DSO can begin generating revenue through ticket sales immediately. In addition the Woodward Corridor can again receive the benefit of an active and vital cultural institution.

The DSO can begin to regain credibility with their existing donors as well as many potential new donors. These new donors have been introduced to the DSO by the many outreach concerts that the musicians have presented during this impasse.

The entire community and the DSO organization can begin the difficult process of healing – nothing heals better than beautiful music performed by gifted musicians!

All this can begin next week if management agrees to binding arbitration.


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DSO Musicians make unconditional offer to return to work!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 3/1/11
Contact: Greg Bowens, Bowens & Co., 248.275.3156, bowensgreg@hotmail.com

DSO STRIKING MUSICIANS MAKE UNCONDITIONAL OFFER TO RETURN TO WORK AND END DEBILITATING 22-WEEK STRIKE AS A WAY OF SALVAGING REMAINING SEASON

Musicians say turn on the stage lights and let the sound of music play again at Orchestra Hall or let the Max Theatre complex continue its slow death as entertainers and audiences shun facility

Detroit – The striking musicians of the DSO are offering to return to work and end the labor dispute while a binding arbitration process runs its course to a new contract.

“It is way past the time for this strike to be settled,” said Gordon Stump, president of the musicians locally. “We are here today to offer a procedure which we believe is fair to all sides, and would put the musicians back on stage immediately and unconditionally.”

The musicians are offering to submit all remaining unresolved issues to binding arbitration before a three person panel. They would select one arbitrator, DSO executives would select one, and these two individuals would select a third. The parties would present and argue their position on each of the unresolved issues, and ultimately, the panel would issue a final and binding decision which was approved by at least two of the three. The majority could adopt the position of one party over the position of the other, or they could propose something different. Any provisions of the arbitrators’ decision which can be made retroactively will be so implemented.

If this procedure is agreeable, as set forth above, the strike ends, the orchestra returns to the stage and everyone can salvage what’s left of this season and prepare for exciting summer and fall seasons, while the arbitration case proceeds to a conclusion.

“We believe this to be a fair, equitable, and expeditious way of preserving this great institution for now, and for future generations,” said Stump.

If it’s not, the Max Fisher Center, home of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, can continue to lose revenue and stature as artists refuse to perform at the beleaguered facility. The organization is 0-6 in its efforts to secure new performers due to the ongoing labor dispute.

The latest entertainer to cancel is the famous R&B and gospel group Take6. They were to replace Grammy award winning singer Bobby McFerrin’s March 3 performance. The two are the latest in a slew of cancellations including the Brass Band of Battle Creek, Sarah Chang, the Bowfire Holiday Heart Strings and the Canadian Brass Christmas. The cancellations are dashing DSO executives’ dreams of competing with the Fox, Music Hall and other top entertainment venues as word spreads in the entertainment world to avoid performing at the Max in Detroit.


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Mail the Media

Help make news, mail the media representatives to help Save Our Symphony!


Media Title First Last E-mail
Daily Tribune Mr. Joe Ballor joe.ballor@dailytribune.com
Detroit Free Press Mr. Steve Byrne spbyrne@freepress.com
Detroit Free Press Ms. Rachel May events@freepress.com
play@freepress.com
WRCJ, 90.9 FM Mr. Chris Felcyn cfelcyn@dptv.org
WRCJ, 90.9 FM Mr. Dave Wagner dwagner@dptv.org
WNZK – AM Mr. Bob Allison boballison@askyourneighbor.com
Comcast, Region A Mr. Fred Eaton fred_eaton@cable.comcast.com
Dearborn Times Herald Mr. Scott Bewick scott.bewick@timesheraldnewspapers.com
Great Stuff Ms. Victoria Lefebvre Victoria.lefebvre@cbsradio.com
Mirror Newspapers Ms. Diana Wing diwing@ameritech.net
MiLife MiTimes news@milifemitimes.com
Detroit Today – WDET Mr. Zac Rosen detroittoday@wdetfm.org
WDET 101.9 FM Detroit Public Radio wdetfm@wdetfm.org
WDET 101.9 FM Detroit Public Radio Mr. Kevin Piotrowski kpiotrowski@wdetfm.org
WDET 101.9 FM Detroit Public Radio PR Intern printern@wdetfm.org
WDET 101.9 FM Detroit Public Radio wdetevents@wdetfm.org
WDET 101.9 FM Detroit Public Radio Mr. Jerome Vaughn jvaughn@wdetfm.org.
WWJ Newsradio 950 Ms. Georgeann Herbert gherbert@cbs.com
C & G Publishing Ms. Michelle Moran kmoran@candgnews.com
Ambassador Magazine Ms. Rebecca Stephens rebecca@ambassadormag.com
American Towns pr@americantowns.com
Fox 2- Detroit Mr. Al Johnson Al.Johnson@foxtv.com
Great Stuff Mr. Frank Bunker editor@greatstuff2do.com
Detroit Jewish News Ms. Esther Ingber calendar@thejewishnews.com
Detroit Legal News Mr. Eric Kent Franz editor@legalnews.com
Detroit Monitor detroitmonitor@gmail.com
DTW News Mr. Patrick Novak editor@dtwnews.com
DTW News Rachel’s Corner rachel@actiondetroit.com
Farmington Press Ms. Kirsten Buys kbuys@candgnews.com
Fox TV Mr. Edward Pevos edward.pevos@foxtv.com
Macomb Daily Ms. Andrea Nobile andrea.nobile@macombdaily.com
Metro Times Mr. Brian Smith bsmith@metrotimes.com
Metro Times Ms. Megan O’Neil cfortune@michronicle.com
Michigan Chronicle editor@michigancitizen.com
Michigan Citizen Ms. Catherine Kelly lmini@hometownlife.com
Observer & Eccentric Newspapers Ms. Lana Mini editor@tellusdetroit.com
The Detroit News Ms. Felecia Henderson fhenderson@detnews.com
The Detroit News Ms. Rita Holt rholt@detnews.com
The Detroit News, Newsroom events@detnews.com
Troy-Somerset Gazette Ms. Cynthia Kmett editor@troy-somersetgazette.com
Voice News Ms. Mary Lou Creamer marylou.creamer@voicenews.com
WDET 101.9 FM Detroit Public Radio Mr. Allen Mazurek amazurek@wdetfm.org
WDET 101.9 FM Detroit Public Radio News news@wdetfm.org
WDIV – Channel 4 assignmentdesk@wdiv.com
WDIV – Channel 4 Ms. Carmen Harlan carmenh@wdiv.com
WDIV – Channel 4 Ms. Paula Tutman paulat@wdiv.com
Windsor Star Mr. Ted Shaw tshaw@thestar.canwest.com
WKBD TV-50 Events PublicAffairs@wkbdtv.com
Ms. Ellyce Field frannyzoe@aol.com
Detroit Free Press Mr. Mark Stryker mstryker@freepress.com
WHFR Dearborn – 89.3 FM Ms. Susan McGraw music@classicalmusicbroadcast.com
Classical Music America Mr. Davis Gloff davisgloff@classicalmusicamerica.com
WNIC 100.3 – FM Mr. Dave Lockhart dave@wnic.com
(Oakland Press) Mr. John Guinn scarpia@comcast.net
Detroit News Mr. Lawrence B. Johnson lawrencebj@gmail.com
Farmington Observer Ms. Stacy Jenkins sjenkins@hometownlife.com
Flint Journal fj@flintjournal.com
British Bandsman Mr. Kenneth Crookston info@britishbandsman.com
Comcast Ms. Colleen Ralph Colleen_Ralph@cable.comcast.com
4 Bars Rest news@4barsrest.com
Dearborn Community Arts Council Stella Greene sgreene@ci.dearborn.mi.us
Dearborn Press & Guide Ms. Andrea Blum ablum@heritage.com
Dearborn Press & Guide Ms. Jodi Rempala jrempala@heritage.com
Dearborn Times Herald Mr. Mike Bewick mike.bewick@timesheraldnewspapers.com
Dearborn Times Herald Mr. Tom Tigani tom.tigani@timesheraldnewspapers.com
TC Times news@tctimes.com
WWJ Newsradio 950 editor@greatstufftodo.com
Mr. Dan Bayer Dan@wkar.msu.edu
Mr. Nick Britsky nbritsky@gmail.com
Comcast Community_bulletinboard@cable.comcast.com
Mirror Newspapers The Mirror Editor mirror@mirrornews.com
The Saginaw News Ms. Jodi McFarland thenews@thesaginawnews.com


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DSO Board of Directors

These are the names of the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra Board of Directors
taken from the DSO Website on February 6, 2011

Stanley Frankel, Chairman of the Board

Executive Committee
Paul M. Huxley, First Vice Chair
Marlies Castaing, Second Vice Chair
Glenda D. Price, Ph.D., Secretary
Arthur A. Weiss, Treasurer
Lloyd E. Reuss, Officer At-large
Clyde Wu, M.D., Officer At-large
Phillip Wm. Fisher, Officer At-large
Lillian Bauder, Ph.D.
Penny B. Blumenstein
Stephen R. D’Arcy
Herman Frankel
Ralph Gerson
Alfred R. Glancy III, Chairman Emeritus
Kelly Hayes, Volunteer Council President
Ronald M. Horwitz
Dr. Arthur L. Johnson
Richard P. Kughn
Bonnie Larson
Melvin A. Lester, M.D.
Arthur C. Liebler
David Robert Nelson
James B. Nicholson, Chairman Emeritus
Bruce D. Peterson
Bernard I. Robertson
Jack A. Robinson
Alan E. Schwartz
Barbara Van Dusen

Directors
Rosette Ajluni
Robert Allesee
Daniel Angelucci
Floy Barthel
George J. Bedrosian
Mrs. Mandell L. Berman
Stephen A. Bromberg
John A. Boll, Sr.
Richard A. Brodie
Lynne Carter, M.D.
Gary L. Cowger
Peter D. Cummings, Chairman Emeritus
Maureen T. D’Avanzo
Karen Davidson
Peter J. Dolan
Walter E. Douglas
Marianne Endicott
Jennifer Fischer
Sidney Forbes
Laura L. Fournier
Mrs. Harold Frank
Barbara Frankel
Paul Ganson*
Brigitte Harris
Gloria Heppner, Ph.D.
Nicholas Hood III
Mark Jannott
Renee Janovsky
Chacona Johnson
George G. Johnson
Michael J. Keegan
The Hon. Damon J. Keith
Harold Kulish
Linda Dresner Levy
Harry A. Lomason II
Ralph J. Mandarino
Mervyn H. Manning
David N. McCammon
Lois A. Miller
Ed Miller
Jim Mitchell
Sean M. Neall
Jay Noren, M.D., M.P.H.
Robert E. L. Perkins, D.D.S.
William F. Pickard
Marilyn Pincus
Stephen Polk
Marjorie S. Saulson
Lois L. Shaevsky
Mrs. Ray A. Shapero
Wei Shen
Jane F. Sherman
Shirley R. Stancato
Stephen Strome
Michael R. Tyson
Ann Marie Uetz
David Usher
Sharon L. Vasquez
R. Jamison Williams
John E. Young

Click HERE for a link to the DSO page


Posted in SOS | 39 Comments

DSO facebook discussed on Michigan Public Radio

Click HERE for the audio:  Michigan Public Radio article on the DSO facebook page…

Social media is an “invitation to involvement

Cornelia Pokryzwa is a long time fan and patron of the orchestra. She thinks the strike discussions on the DSO facebook fan page are valuable. She likes that  all kinds of people are participating in the discussion -  from musicians and DSO season ticket holders to people who’ve never even seen a DSO performance. But Pokryzwa thinks management could do more to interact with the people who post on the fan page:

“Social media is an invitation to involvement, and so once people are involved enough to comment, then it seems that the strategy should be to engage them and not just host a discussion board. There are a lot of angry people on there and I think they need to do something…to get their fans back.”

Expert: “You cannot negotiate a labor agreement on the social media.”

Christie Nordhielm, a marketing professor at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, says “you cannot negotiate a labor agreement on the social media. It doesn’t work.” She calls it a “poor use of social media as a tool.”

Nordhielm believes the DSO’s image will be hurt by the fight on facebook, but the question is for how long. Her advice for the DSO management?

“First: Shut up. Just stop. And then second: Wait quietly until people forget.”

She says lucky for the DSO, the public has a short attention span. The question is: will the musicians?

Click HERE for a link to the article on Michigan Public Radio.


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